National Parks of Virginia

There is currently twenty-two official National Park Service Sites in Virginia and nine associated sites.

Official National Parks of Virginia

  • Appalachian National Scenic Trail
  • Appomattox Court House National Historical Park
  • Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial
  • Assateague Island National Seashore
  • Blue Ridge Parkway
  • Booker T. Washington National Monument
  • Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park
  • Colonial National Historical Park
    • Cape Henry Memorial
    • Historic Jamestowne
    • Yorktown Battlefield
  • Cumberland Gap National Historical Park
  • Fort Monroe National Monument
  • Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park
  • George Washington Birthplace National Monument
  • George Washington Memorial Parkway
  • Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
  • Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site
  • Manassas National Battlefield Park
  • Petersburg National Battlefield
  • Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail
  • Prince William Forest Park
  • Richmond National Battlefield Park
  • Shenandoah National Park
  • Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

Associated Sites Virginia

  • Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail
  • Chesapeake Bay
  • Civil War Defenses of Washington
  • Claude Moor Colonial Farm
  • Great Falls Park
  • Green Springs
  • Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail
  • Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail
  • Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail
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Virginia

Virginia National Parks

Appalachian National Scenic Trail

Depending on where you are from, the Appalachian National Scenic Trail either starts in Mount Katahdin, Maine and ends in Springer Mountain, Georgia or starts in Springer Mountain, Georgia and ends in Katahdin, Maine. The Appalachian Trail is 2,181 miles long and passes thru 14 states.

There is 530.3  miles of trail in the state of Virginia and about 20 miles that runs along the Virginia/West Virginia border.  The trail follows the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Skyline Drive thru much of Virginia.

Every year several thousand people attempt to thru-hike the trail.  Tens of thousands of people will hike sections of the trail each year.  The trail was officially completed in 1937 but the improvement has been ongoing since then.  The trail is maintained by 31 different trail clubs and other partnerships.

Appomattox Court House National Historical Park

Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Assateague Island National Seashore

Blue Ridge Parkway

Booker T. Washington National Monument

Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park

Colonial National Historical Park

Cape Henry Memorial

Historic Jamestowne

Yorktown Battlefield

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

Fort Monroe National Monument

Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park

George Washington Birthplace National Monument

George Washington Memorial Parkway

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site

Manassas National Battlefield Park

Petersburg National Battlefield

Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail

Prince William Forest Park

Richmond National Battlefield Park

Shenandoah National Park

Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

Associated Sites Virginia

Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail

Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail is about 3,000 miles of water routes along the Chesapeake Bay watershed.  The rivers are located in the following states – Washington D.C, Deleware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. The water routes follow the voyages of Captain John Smith between 160 -1609. Smith produced the first maps of the region.

The much of the Historic trail is included in the Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network.  The trail passes thru many state and local sites where you can rent canoes and kayaks.  Boat tours are offered in the bay.

Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail was established on December 19, 2006.

Photo Credit – NPCA Photos, CC BY-ND 2.0

Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network

The Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network is a collection of over 150 parks, refuges, museums, historic communities, and water trails along the Chesapeake Bay watershed.  This network included sites in Washington D.C, Deleware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.

The Chesapeake Bary watershed drains into the large estuary called the Chesapeake Bay.  The Chesapeake Bary is a 200-mile long bay that connects the Susquehanna River and the Atlantic Ocean.  Over 15o rivers and streams drain into the bay.  The bay ranges from 2.8 miles wide to 30 miles.  There is an estimated 11,684 miles of shoreline.

Visitors to the Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network can explore a range of sites and learn about the history, culture and natural importance of the area.

Photo Credit – Forsaken Fotos, CC BY 2.0

Civil War Defenses of Washington

Claude Moor Colonial Farm

Great Falls Park

Green Springs

Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail

The Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail is primarily an auto trail thru Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina.  The trail is operated in cooperative effort by the U.S. Forest Service, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, National Park Service, and local efforts.  The trail is a 330-mile corridor.  The trail follows the route American patriots traveled during the Revolutionary War to the Battle of King’s Mountain.

These men hike and road from all over the Appalachian mountains to join the militia and fight for American’s independence.  Today the trail is 330 miles long and follows many of the original roads used by the men marching.  Important sites along the trail include the Fort Watauga Monument, Dunn’s Meadow, Roaring Creek, and Bedford’s Hill.

Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail was created in September 1980.

Photo Credit – DM

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail is a 680-mile long Historical Trail.  The trail is sometimes known as the Washington–Rochambeau Revolutionary Route.  The route follows the road used by George Washington’s Continental Army and Jean-Baptiste de Rochambeau’s Expédition Particulière took on their way from Newport, Rode Island to Yorktown, Virginia. Yorktown was the final battle of the American Revolutionary War.

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail is primary an auto trail.  While the route forces on the march to Yorktown, the trail passes thru or near many other important revolutionary war sites. Virginia sites include the Yorktown Battlefield at Colonial National Historical Park.

Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail passes thru Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Washington D.C, and Virginia.

By DaderotOwn work, Public Domain, Link

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