National Parks of South Carolina

There is currently seven National Park Service Site in South Carolina and three associated sites.

Official National Parks of South Carolina

  • Charles Pinckney National Historic Site
  • Congaree National Park
  • Cowpens National Battlefield
  • Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie Natioanal Historical Park
  • Kings Mountain National Military Park
  • Ninety Six National Historic Site
  • Reconstruction Era National Historical Park

Associated sites of South Carolina

  • Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor
  • Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail
  • South Carolina National Heritage Corridor
South Carolina Placeholder
South Carolina

South Carolina National Parks

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site

Congaree National Park

Cowpens National Battlefield

Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie Natioanal Historical Park

Kings Mountain National Military Park

Ninety Six National Historic Site

Reconstruction Era National Historical Park

Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor

The Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor covers the Atlantic coastal region of Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.  The area focuses on protecting the Gullah-Geechee people and culture.  The Gullah-Geechee people are descendend from West African slaves forced to work in the cotton fields, rice paddies, and indigo plantations.

Visitors can explore the unique culture thru seveal museums, historical churches and schoolhouse and the remains of plantations.  There are 79 Atlantic barrier island in the area.  Charles Pinckney National Historic Site is located in the region.

Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor was created in October 12, 2006.

Photo Credit – Leigh Caldwell

Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail

The Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail is primarily an auto trail thru Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina.  The trail is operated in cooperative effort by the U.S. Forest Service, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, National Park Service, and local efforts.  The trail is a 330-mile corridor.  The trail follows the route American patriots traveled during the Revolutionary War to the Battle of King’s Mountain.

These men hike and road from all over the Appalachian mountains to join the militia and fight for American’s independence.  Today the trail is 330 miles long and follows many of the original roads used by the men marching.  Important sites along the trail include the Fort Watauga Monument, Dunn’s Meadow, Roaring Creek, and Bedford’s Hill.

Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail was created in September 1980.

Photo Credit – DM

South Carolina National Heritage Corridor

View all the National Park Service Sites in neighboring states: