There is currently seven National Park Service Site in Montana and four associated sites.

Official National Parks of Montana

  • Big Hole National Battlefield
  • Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area
  • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site
  • Glacier National Park
  • Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site
  • Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument
  • Nez Perce National Historical Park
    • Bear Paw Battlefield
    • Cayon Creek
  • Yellowstone National Park

Associated sites of Montana

  • Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site
  • Ice Age Floods Geologic Trail
  • Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail
Montana Placeholder
Montana

Montana National Parks

Big Hole National Battlefield

Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area

Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

Glacier National Park

Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Nez Perce National Historic Park

The Nez Perce National Historical Park follows the Nez Perce people’s traditional lands and history and their resistance to the United States government’s forced relocation.  The park contains 38 sites in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.

The park is headquartered in Spalding, Idaho.  It was created on May 15, 1965.  Management of the 38 sites is split between NPS and several other federal and state agencies.

There are two sites in Montana.  These are Bear Paw Battlefield and Cayon Creek.  Big Hole National Battlefield is counted as a separate unit but is also part of Nez Perce National Historical Park.

Things to do in Nez Perce National Historical Park: Hiking, Short Walks, Historical Sites, Museums

How to get to Nez Perce National Historical Park: There are 38 different sites spread out between Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Look at the park map to figure out the best routes to the sites.

Where to Stay in Nez Perce National Historical Park: Many of the towns near the sites offer accommodation options.

Nez Perce National Historical Park Entrance Fee: Free

Nez Perce National Historical Park Official Website: Click Here

Map of Nez Perce National Historical Park: Download

Credit: NPS Photo

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park is the world’s oldest national park.  This special area

Get help planning your trip to Yellowstone National Park

Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site

Ice Age Floods Geologic Trail

The Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail will massive auto/hiking trail that follows the geological effects of the last ice age.  The trail branches out and sections run thru the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. The trail was designated in 2009 and much of the trail is still being formally developed.

At the end of the last ice age, a sheet of ice blocked several important rivers such as Clark Fork and the Columbia.  These ice dams caused the water to back-up and created massive flooding. The effect of this flooding can be seen in massive canyons such as Columbia River Gorge and Wallula Gap.

Current stops on the trail include Multnomah Falls, Farragut State Park, Beacon Rock State Park, and Dry Falls/Sun Lakes State Park.

Things to do in Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail: Hiking, Museums, Scenic Walks, Auto Tours

How to get to Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail: The sites are located through Oregon, Montana Idaho and Washington.

Where to Stay in Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail:

Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail Entrance Fee: There may be nominal fees at trail-related federal, state, or locally owned historic sites and interpretive facilities.

Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail Official Website: Click Here

Map of Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail: Download

Photo Credit – Ken Lund 

Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail

The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail follows the route Meriwether Lewis and William Clark took across the United States’ newly purchased territory.  The trail starts at Camp Dubois, Illinois and passes thru Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and ends in Washington.  The trail is a combination of auto, land and water routes.

The Lewis and Clark expedition started in May 1804 with the goal to find a practical route across the western region of North America. They were to lay claim to these lands to limit European expansion.  The expedition was a success.  Lewis and Clark crossed the Louisiana purchase and made it to the Pacific Ocean.  They recorded the plants, animals, and landscapes as they traveled.  They laid the foundations for future relationships with the American Indian tribes of the relationships.

The trail was established on November 10, 1978.  There are over 100 stops along the trail.

Things to do in Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail: Hiking, Auto Tours, Museums,

How to get to Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail: The sites are located in the 16 states the trail runs through.

Where to Stay in Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail: There are various places to stay along the trail.

Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Entrance Fee: There may be nominal fees at trail-related federal, state, or locally owned historic sites and interpretive facilities.

Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Official Website: Click Here

Map of Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail: Download

Photo Credit – NPS

View all the National Park Service Sites in neighboring states: