National Parks of Montana

There is currently seven National Park Service Site in Montana and four associated sites.

Official National Parks of Montana

  • Big Hole National Battlefield
  • Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area
  • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site
  • Glacier National Park
  • Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site
  • Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument
  • Nez Perce National Historical Park
    • Bear Paw Battlefield
    • Cayon Creek
  • Yellowstone National Park

Associated sites of Montana

  • Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site
  • Ice Age Floods Geologic Trail
  • Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail
Montana Placeholder
Montana

Montana National Parks

Big Hole National Battlefield

Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area

Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

Glacier National Park

Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Nez Perce National Historic Park

The Nez Perce National Historical Park follows the Nez Perce people’s traditional lands and history and their resistance to the United States government’s forced relocation.  The park contains 38 sites in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.

The park is headquartered in Spalding, Idaho.  It was created on May 15, 1965.  Management of the 38 sites is split between NPS and several other federal and state agencies.

There are two sites in Montana.  These are Bear Paw Battlefield and Cayon Creek.  Big Hole National Battlefield is counted as a separate unit but is also part of Nez Perce National Historical Park.

Credit: NPS Photo

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park is the world’s oldest national park.  This special area

Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site

Ice Age Floods Geologic Trail

The Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail will massive auto/hiking trail that follows the geological effects of the last ice age.  The trail branches out and sections run thru the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. The trail was designated in 2009 and much of the trail is still being formally developed.

At the end of the last ice age, a sheet of ice blocked several important rivers such as Clark Fork and the Columbia.  These ice dams caused the water to back-up and created massive flooding. The effect of this flooding can be seen in massive canyons such as Columbia River Gorge and Wallula Gap.

Current stops on the trail include Multnomah Falls, Farragut State Park, Beacon Rock State Park, and Dry Falls/Sun Lakes State Park.

Photo Credit – Ken Lund 

Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park preserves the Lewis and Clark Expedition’s 1805-1806 winter encampment site.  The area protects a replica of Fort Clatsop and other sites associated with the encampment.  These sites include the Fort to Sea Trail, Clark’s Dismal Nitch, Netul Landing, Saltworks, and Station Camp.

This site celebrated the completion of Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery.  They reached their goal of reaching the Pacific Ocean.  Once here, they spent the winter before heading home to share their discoveries.  They built a small fort called Fort Clatsop for the winter.  While there, they developed relationships with the indigenous people before heading back east.  When they left Fort Clatsop, they turned the fort over to the local tribe.

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park was established on May 29, 1958, as Fort Clatsop National Memorial.  On October 20, 2004, the park was expanded and renamed Lewis and Clark National Historical Park and includes sites in both Oregon and Washington.

Photo Credit – NPS

View all the National Park Service Sites in neighboring states: