National Parks of Georgia

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Georgia is part of the National Park Service’s Southeast Region. Georgia is one of the original thirteen colonies and a former member of the Confederate States of America. Georiga has a vast history as from the Native Americans to modern-day. As vast as the history is, Georgia has a diverse landscape from swampland to the Appalachian mountains. There is currently eleven National Park Service Site in Georgia and four associated sites.

Official National Parks of Georgia

  • Andersonville National Historic Site
  • Appalachian National Scenic Trail
  • Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area
  • Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park
  • Cumberland Island National Seashore
  • Fort Frederica National Monument
  • Fort Pulaski National Monument
  • Jimmy Carter National Historic Site
  • Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site
  • Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park

Associated sites of Georgia

  • Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area
  • Augusta Canal National Heritage Area
  • Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor
  • Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

Map of National Parks in Georgia

Georgia Placeholder
Georgia

Georgia National Parks

Andersonville National Historic Site

Photo Credit: Ken Lund, CC BY-SA 2.0

Appalachian National Scenic Trail

Depending on where you are from, the Appalachian National Scenic Trail either starts in Mount Katahdin, Maine and ends in Springer Mountain, Georgia or starts in Springer Mountain, Georgia and ends in Katahdin, Maine. The Appalachian Trail is 2,181 miles long and passes through 14 states.

There is 75 miles of trail in the state of Georgia.  The trail starts at Springer Mountains – elevation 3,782 feet.  It will climb to the 4,461-foot summit of Blood Mountain before heading into Tennessee.

Every year several thousand people attempt to thru-hike the trail.  Tens of thousands of people will hike sections of the trail each year.  The trail was officially completed in 1937 but the improvement has been ongoing since then.  The trail is maintained by 31 different trail clubs and other partnerships.

Related Posts:

Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area

Photo Credit: Shawn Taylor, CC BY 2.0

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

Photo Credit: NPS

Cumberland Island National Seashore

Photo Credit: NPS

Fort Frederica National Monument

Photo Credit: Ralph Daily, CC BY 2.0

Fort Pulaski National Monument

Photo Credit: Ken Lund, CC BY-SA 2.0

Jimmy Carter National Historic Site

Photo Credit: NPS Photo

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

Photo Credit: Shawn Taylor, CC BY 2.0

Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site

Photo Credit: GPA Photo Archive, CC BY 2.0

Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park

Photo Credit: NPS

Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area

Photo Credit: Bruce Tuten, CC BY 2.0

Augusta Canal National Heritage Area

Photo Credit: Alistair Paterson, CC BY-SA 2.0

Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor

The Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor covers the Atlantic coastal region of Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.  The area focuses on protecting the Gullah-Geechee people and culture.  The Gullah-Geechee people are descended from West African slaves forced to work in the cotton fields, rice paddies, and indigo plantations.

Visitors can explore the unique culture thru several museums, historical churches and schoolhouses and the remains of plantations.  There are 79 Atlantic barrier islands in the area.  Charles Pinckney National Historic Site is located in the region.

Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor was created in October 12, 2006.

Photo Credit – Leigh Caldwell

Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail follows the different routes members of the Cherokee, Muscogee (Creek), Seminole, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Ponca, and Ho-Chunk/Winnebago nations were forced to march for resettlement as part of the Indian Removal Act.  The Trail of Tears follows the four main routes from Tennessee, North Carolina, and Georgia through Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas on their way to Oklahoma.

The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail stands as a reminder of the horrific treatment the American Indians suffered at the hands of the U.S government.  It is estimated between 2,000 – 8,000 Cherokee died along the trail (that doesn’t include deaths of any of the other tribes or deaths in the Seminole wats).

Today, visitors to the Trail of Tears can drive any one of the four main autoroutes and visit sites such as the Cherokee County Historical Museum, Brainerd Mission Cemetery,  Cherokee National Museum, and Fort Payne Cabin Site to learn more about the journey the American Indians were forced to make and the challenges they faced.

Trail of Tears National Historic Trail was created in 1987.

View all the National Park Service Sites in neighboring states:

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Heading to Georgia and want to explore a couple of national park service units? The National Parks of Georgia have plenty of history and wilderness to explore. #nationalparks #nationalpark #findyourpark #nationalparkobsessed #georgia

Jennifer Melroy

    Jennifer has been obsessed with national parks as a child.  This Tennessee native spent her childhood exploring the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and traveling with her parents to National Parks and around the Caribbean.  She is always planning her next adventure and is ready to see the world while trying to visit all 59 National Park (*She is ignoring the hunk of concrete that just became a national park).

    Jennifer Melroy has 116 posts and counting. See all posts by Jennifer Melroy

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