Jagged peaks, pristine alpine lakes, and gorgeous vistas, it’s hard to find a park prettier than Glacier National Park. One of the best ways to explore Glacier is to wake up inside the park. Camping in Glacier is a real treat but a camping trip to Glacier can be a little tricky to plan. So we have broken down what you need to know and created this comprehensive guide to Glacier camping.

Camping in Glacier can put you close to many of the park’s major attractions. This complete guide covers everything you need to know to plan a Glacier camping trip including information on the Glacier campgrounds, location, how to secure a campsite and so much more.

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Are you considering camping in Glacier National Park? Click here for the ultimate guide Glacier Campgrounds and get ready for a Glacier camping trip. 

Glacier  National Park Camping / Camping at Glacier National Park / National Park Camping / Many Glacier Camping / St. Mary Campground / Montana Camping / Winter Camping

Glacier Campgrounds at a Glance

CampgroundRegionReservationsSeason Sites Fees ADA SitesAmenities
ApgarGoing to the SunNoYear-Round194$20YesD, F, FP, G, S, W
AvalancheGoing to the SunNoLate May – Early September87$20YesF, FP, G, W
Bowman LakeWestNoLate May – September45$15NoFP, PA, W
Cut BankEastNoLate May – Mid September14$10NoFP, PA
Fish CreekWestYesLate May – Early September178$23YesD, F, FP, G, W
Kintla LakeWestNoLate May – Mid September13$15NoG, FP, PA, W
Logging CreekWestNoJuly – Mid September7$10NoG, FP, PA
Many GlacierEastYesLate May – Late September109$23NoD, F, FP, G, W
Quartz CreekWestNoJuly – Mid September7$10NoFP, PA
Rising SunGoing to the SunNoMid June – Mid September84$20YesD, F, FP, G
Sprague CreekGoing to the SunNoMid May – Mid September25$20YesF, FP, W
St. MaryGoing to the SunYesYear-Round148$23YesD, F, FP, G, W
Two MedicineEastNoJune – September100$20YesD, F, FP, G, W

Amenities Key

  • D – Dump Station
  • F – Flush Toilets
  • FP – Fire Pit
  • G – Generator
  • H – Full Hookups
  • P – Pit Toliet
  • PA – Accessible Pit Toliet
  • L – Laundry
  • S – Shower
  • W – Water

Getting to Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park is located in northern Montana along the Canadian Border. The park has several entrances along it’s east and west borders. Glacier can be accessed via US Highway 2, 17, or 89. The closest airport to the park is Glacier Park International Airport (FCA) located in Kalispell, MT. This airport is 30 miles from the West entrance. Other nearby airports include Missoula International Airport (MSO), Great Falls International Airport (GTF), and Calgary International Airport (YYC).

Amtrak offers rail service to the East Glacier, West Glacier, and Whitefish train depots on the Empire Builder line. Shuttles are offered from the depots to the park. Please call 855-733-4522 for more info.

Glacier National Park has a shuttle bus that travels the Going-to-the-Sun Road and there are several private tour operators who can arrange tours of Glacier.

Estimated Drive Time to Glacier National Park

  • Kalispell, Montana – 0.75 hours
  • Great Falls, Montana – 2.5 hours
  • Calgary, Alberta, Canada – 3 hours
  • Spokane, Washington – 4.5 hours
  • Bozeman, Montana – 5 hours
  • Edmonton, Alberta, Canada – 5.75 hours
  • Jackson, Wyoming – 8 hours
  • Seattle, Washington – 8.5 hours

Estimated Drive time to Glacier National Park from nearby National Parks

  • Waterton Lakes National Park – 1.25 hours
  • Banff National Park – 4.25 hours
  • Yellowstone National Park – 7 hours
  • Jasper National Park – 8 hours
  • Grand Teton National Park – 8 hours
  • Badlands National Park – 11.5 hours

Things to Know about Glacier Camping

  • Glacier National Parks had 13 campgrounds spread out across the park. Camping is only permitted in these campgrounds and in designed backcountry areas.
  • Two Campgrounds are open year-round. The other 11 campgrounds are usually open from late spring to early fall with a few opening later during the summer.
  • Reservations are available for 3 Glacier campgrounds – Fish Creek and St. Mary offer reservations for most sites and Many Glacier offers reservations for select sites.
  • Reservations can be made up to six months in advance. Reservations are limited and if you want a reserved site you need to be ready to book exactly six months in advance of the first day of your trip.
  • Seven Campgrounds have ADA specific sites. Reservable ADA sites are available at St. Mary and Fish Cree. First-come, first-serve accessible sites can be found at Apgar, Avalanche, Rising Sun, Sprague Creek, and Two Medicine
  • Generator use is permitted in select campground and select sites during the following hours: 8:00 – 10:00 am; 12 noon – 2:00 pm; and 5:00 – 7:00 pm.
  • The larger the RV the fewer campsites are available and only select sites in each campground can handle longer vehicles. RV and travel trailers are limited to 40 ft in length.
    • Apgar and St. Mary can accommodate up to 40 ft
    • Many Glacier and Two Medicine can accommodate up to 35 ft.
    • Avalanche and Rising Sun can accommodate up to 25 ft.
  • Hookups are NOT available in Glacier National Park. Dump stations are available at Apgar, Fish Creek, Many Glacier, Rising Sun, St. Mary, Two Medicine.
  • Standard campsites can have up to 8 people.  You are allowed a maximum of two vehicles and two tents. Large groups should reserve a group site in Apgar, Many Glacier, St. Mary, or Two Medicine.
  • Camping in Glacier is limited to 14 days between July 1 and Labor Day and 30 days between Labor Day and June 30.
  • Checkout time for all campgrounds is 12:00 (noon). If staying another night in a first-come, first-serve site re-register by 11:30 am.
  • All wood and charcoal fires are allowed unless fire danger prompts special restrictions. All fires must be contained in park-provided fire pits. Please do not transport firewood. Burn it where you buy it. Firewood can be purchased at local general stores. The collection of vegetation for fires is prohibited.
    • Please ensure that your fire out full out before leaving it unattended.
  • Store all food items in your car or bear box.  Please do NOT leave any food, utensils out, or any scented items.  This includes toothpaste, toothbrush, chapstick.  Please put everything else in your car or bear box.  Bears and other scavengers are drawn to campgrounds in search of food items. If the animals find food, they will continue to hang around and start to become an issue. Please help keep the wildlife wild by not feeding them and remember a fed bear is a dead bear.

What to pack for camping in Glacier National Park?

  1. Printed Campsite Reservation: Just in case anyone asks for it.
  1. America the Beautiful National Parks Pass: Glacier National Park costs $30 for a 7-day pass.  If you intend to visit more than 3 National Park Services sites in a year, the America the Beautiful Pass will more than pay for itself.
  1. National Park Passport: The National Park Passport Book is the cheapest and best souvenir of your national park adventures. This book makes it easy to collect the National Park Cancellation Stamps. The cancellation stamps have the date of your visit and make it easy to track when you visited each national park service unit.
  1. Tent: This is one of the heaviest and most important pieces of camping gear. It is your shelter from the elements at night.
  1. Sleeping Pad: A sleeping pad is a small, packable inflatable mattress. Here is my favorite closed cell sleeping pad.
  1. Sleeping Bag: Your sleeping bag is important for a good night’s sleep and preventing you from getting to cold.
  1. Pillow: An inflatable pillow is a lightweight comfort item that can make getting a good night’s sleep much easier.
  1. Camp Stove: This portable mini backpacking stove makes car camping cooking much easier. I’d rather cook on this over a campfire any day.
  1. Fuel for the camp stove: I generally by my camping fuel at Walmart or REI on my way to the park. You can’t fly with it so it’s just easier to get on site.
  1. Cooler: One great thing about car camping is that you can keep a cooler in your car and it can keep fresh meat cold and provide cold drinks.
  1. Kitchen Set: It doesn’t take much to make an impressive camp meal but having the right tools can make you seem like a gourmet chef.
  1. Cooking Pot: Since I use a camping stove, I have this great set of folding pots that I do most of my camp cooking with.
  1. Spork: The Spork is the essential eating utensil of the campsite.
  1. Food: If I bring a cooler, I love planning easy to cook camp meals with fresh ingredients otherwise, I use a mix of dry backpacking foods.
  1. Snacks – There are limited services in the park.  So pick up all your snacks before you go.  Pack a couple of different options so you are prepared for any craving.
    • Fruit:  Pick hard fruits such as apples or pears.  These hold-up in the heat and in packs without getting squished to mush. Another option is freeze-dried fruit. Freeze-dried strawberries are the BOMB.  They are crunchy, sweet and the best part is they are lightweight and yummy.  These are my new favorite trail snack.
    • Vegetables: Cucumbers and carrots hold up well during hiking and in a hot car.
    • Granola Bars:  Take your favorite non-coated in chocolate granola bars.  Anything coated in chocolate will melt and be a sticky mess.  My favorite is a selection of Cliff Bars. They are great even when squished.
  1. Refillable Water Bottles – Do your part to reduce litter in our parks by bringing a refillable water bottle with you. A reusable and refillable water bottle can save you a lot of money and really help the environment. Here are my favorite water bottles
  1. Hydration Bladder – If you are hiking longer distances, a hydration bladder is the best way to hike with significant quantities of water. It is a rare hike when I don’t bring a full bladder with me.
  1. Sunscreen – You don’t want to get burned on your visit.
  1. Lip balm – Your lips need just as much sun protection as your skin does.
  1. Sunglasses – Similar to sunscreen, you need a good pair of polarized sunglasses to protect your eyes from the glare of the sun.
  1. Hat – Hats are another sun protection device. A hat can keep the sun off your face and neck and help minimize the need for sunscreen while on the trail.
  1. First aid kit – As with any outdoor adventure, accidents happen. It is better to be prepared and have a compact first-aid kit ready to help with any accidents.
  1. Headlamp – Always keep a headlamp handy. You never know when you might want it. It can be used for midnight bathroom runs to sunrise/sunset hikes. A good headlamp makes it easy to operate in the dark.
  1. Shoes – Shoes are probably the most important piece of gear to any hiker. Hiking shoes should be seen as an investment. On the trail, your feet are your transportation and a solid pair of hiking shoes help support your feet and can prevent injury.
  1. Hiking Day Pack – A good day pack is the best way to transport all your gear when hiking. I highly recommend getting a backpack that is designed for outdoor use. These packs come with handy pockets and straps. My 40 L day pack has a pocket for my water bladder and a clip to hold the water line in place.
  1. National Park Obsessed Shirt – Share your love of the National Parks and support National Park Obsessed with a National Park Obsessed T-Shirt.

If you are new to visiting the National Parks, check out our National Park Essentials Guide to get you started.

National Parks are on my Bucket List T-Shirts
$29.00
Glacier National Park Print Poster
$26.00
Jemaine, the Traveling Goat Book
$19.99

Where to camp in Glacier National Park?

Glacier Campground Map

Campgrounds in Glacier National Park

  • Apgar Campground
  • Avalanche Campground
  • Bowman Lake Campground
  • Cut Bank Campground
  • Fish Creek Campground
  • Kintla Lake Campground
  • Logging Creek Campground
  • Many Glacier Campground
  • Quartz Creek Campground
  • Rising Sun Campground
  • Sprague Creek Campground
  • St. Mary Campground
  • Two Medicine Campground

Campgrounds in Waterton Lakes National Park

  • Belly River Campground
  • Townsite Campground

Campgrounds near Glacier National Park

  • Chewing Black Bones Campground
  • Columbia Falls RV Park and Campground
  • Glacier Peaks RV Park & Campground
  • Johnson’s Campground and RV Park
  • LaSalle RV Park and Campground
  • Mountain Meadow RV Park
  • Mountain View RV Park
  • Rocky Mountain HI Campground
  • St. Mary / East Glacier KOA
  • West Glacier KOA Resort
  • West Glacier RV Park

Getting a Glacier Campsite

Glacier Camping Reservations

Only 3 Glacier National Park campgrounds offer reservations. These campgrounds are Fish Creek, St. Mary, and 1/2 of the Many Glacier campsites. If you are a large group cam[ping together, group sites in Apgar can be reserved as well.

Campground reservations can be made online at Receation.gov. Reservations are can be made up to six months in advance. Reservations open at 10 a.m (EST).

It is highly recommended to make your reservation as early as possible this is especially true if wanting to make a July or August reservation. I’d create your account on Receation.gov and be ready for at 10 am exactly six months before the trip.

Glacier First-come, first-serve Campsites

First-come, first-serve are available at Apgar, Avalanche, Bowman Lake, Cut Bank, Kintla Lake, Logging Creek, Quartz Creek, Rising Sun, Sprague Creek, Two Medicine and half of the sites at Many Glacier.

There are 630 first-come, first-serve sites in Glacier. Depending on where you would like to camp campsites can be a little hard to get. Campgrounds along the Going-to-the-Sun Road and Many Glacier are the most popular and fill mid-morning.

If you are arriving late in the day, your best bet for space is Logging Creek, Quartz Creek, or Cut Bank.

Get your desired campground and check the campsite board for directions on claiming your site.

Typical Glacier Campsite Fill Times:

These are averages based on the 2019 and 2018 fill times for the season. Please note that these are rough estimates and can vary greatly. The earlier you can get to a campground the better.

Friday and Saturday and holidays have earlier fill times.

  • Apgar Campground – mid-afternoon during summer, rarely fills rest of the year
  • Avalanche Campground- mid-afternoon
  • Bowman Lake Campground – mid to late afternoon
  • Cut Bank Campground – mid to late afternoon (if it fill)
  • Fish Creek Campground – reservation
  • Kintla Lake Campground – early to mid-afternoon
  • Logging Creek Campground – rarely fills
  • Many Glacier Campground – mid-morning
  • Quartz Creek Campground – rarely fills
  • Rising Sun Campground – mid-morning
  • Sprague Creek Campground – mid-morning
  • St. Mary Campground – reservation during summer, rarely fills rest of the year
  • Two Medicine Campground – early to late afternoon

RV Camping in Glacier National Park

There are no RV hookups in Glacier National Park. The longer your RV is the more limited your camping option. Not every campsite in a campground can accommodate the maximum length trailer.

The following Glacier campgrounds can accommodate RVs or travel trailers:

  • Apgar Campground – up to 40 ft in length
  • Avalanche Campground- up to 26 ft in length
  • Bowman Lake Campground – up to 21 ft in length
  • Cut Bank Campground – No RV’s or trailiers
  • Fish Creek Campground – up to 35 ft in length
  • Kintla Lake Campground – up to 21 ft in length
  • Logging Creek Campground – up to 21 ft in length
  • Many Glacier Campground – up to 35 ft in length
  • Quartz Creek Campground – No RV’s or trailiers
  • Rising Sun Campground – up to 25 ft in length
  • Sprague Creek Campground – No RV’s or trailiers
  • St. Mary Campground – up to 40 ft in length
  • Two Medicine Campground – up to 35 ft in length

Glacier National Park Campgrounds

Apgar Campground

Apgar Campground is the largest campground in Glacier National Park. This campground is nested on the western side of the park in a dense forest near the shores of Lake McDonald. The campground is located near Apgar Village and associated amenities such as visitor center, camp store, gift shops, restaurant, boat rentals, and shuttle service.

Apgar provides convenient access to the Going-to-the-Sun Road,.

Sites: 194 sites

Cost: $20 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, this campground is first-come, first-served.

ADA specific sites: Yes, there are 2 designated campsites are C152 and O122.

RVs?: Yes, 25 sites can accommodate RV’s up to 40 ft.

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Potable water, fire pit, food locker, flush toilets, picnic table, showers, sinks, disposal station

Season: Apgar Campground is open year-round.

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid-afternoon during the summer

Closest General Store: Apgar Village

Photo Credit: National Park Service

Avalanche Campground

Avalanche Campground is a centrally located campground along the Going-to-the-Sun Road. This campground is a popular choice for campers. The Trail of Cedars and Avalanche Lake hiking trails begin nearby. This Glacier campground is located in the old-growth cedar and hemlock trees.

Sites: 87 sites

Cost: $20 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, this campground is first-come, first-served.

ADA specific sites: Yes, the designated campsite is A33.

RVs?: Yes, 50 sites can accommodate RV’s up to 26 ft.

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, fire pits, food locker, flush toilets

Season: Avalanche Campground is open from late May to early September

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid-afternoon

Closest General Store: Apgar Village

Are you considering camping in Glacier National Park? Click HERE for the ultimate guide Glacier Campgrounds and get ready for a Glacier camping trip.
Photo: David Restivo, NPS

Bowman Lake Campground

Bowman Lake Campground is a remote campground reached via a rough, dusty, dirt road with blind curves. The campground is located near the shore of Bowman Lake and many of the campsites have trees for shade. This is a primitive campground away from the hustle and crowds of the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

Sites: 45 sites

Cost: $15 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, this campground is first-come, first-served.

ADA specific sites: Yes, there are 2 designated campsites are #3 and #7.

RVs?: Sort of, vehicles are limited to 21 ft in length

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: portable water, vault toilets, fire pit

Season: Bowman Lake is open from late May to September

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid to late afternoon

Closest General Store: West Glacier

Photo: David Restivo, NPS

Cut Bank Campground

Cut Bank is one of Glacier’s smaller campgrounds. This small campground is tucked in on the east side of the park in between St. Mary and Two Medicine. The campground is accessed via a dirt road and is ideal for tent campers. The road into this campground isn’t accessible to trailers or RV’s. This is a quiet campground that is a bit off the beaten path while still providing access to the Going-to-the-Sun Road and Two Medicine.

This is a primitive campground and there is no water. Bring all water with you.

Sites: 14

Cost: $10

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: No, but the toilets are accessible.

RVs?: No RV’s or trailers

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Picnic tables, fire pits, pit toilets

Season: Late May to mid-September

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid to late afternoon (if it fill)

Closest General Store: Kiowa or St. Mary

Photo Credit: Jonathan C. Wheeler, CC BY 2.0

Fish Creek Campground

Fish Creek Campground is located near Apgar Village and is the second largest campground in the park. Fish Creek is surrounded by trees and has some shade. The campground is located near Lake McDonald and some campsites offer lake views. This is a central campground and is located near the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

Sites: 178

Cost: $23 per night

Reservations Accepted?: Yes, up to six months in advance

ADA specific sites: Yes, the designated campsites are A8, A10, A12, A34, B65, B68, D158, and D160.

RVs?: Yes, 18 sites can accommodate RV’s up to 35 ft.

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, fire pits, flush toilets, dump station

Season: Fish Creek Campground is from late May to early September

Typical Fill Time: Fills via reservation

Closest General Store: Apgar Village

Photo: NPS/Gabriel Morrow

Kintla Lake Campground

Kintla Lake Campground is a remote frontcountry campground near the Canadian border. This small campground is located in an area known as the North Fork. The campground can only be reached via a bumpy dirt road. While the road in can handle vehicles up to 21 ft. in length this mostly a tent campground. The campground is located on the shores of Kintla Lake and nearby trees offer privacy and shade.

There is no gas in Polebridge and limited supplies. Come prepared.

Sites: 13

Cost: $15 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: Yes, the designated campsite is #13.

RVs?: Sort of, vehicles are limited to 21 ft in length

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, fire pits, pit toilets, some sites have picnic tables

Season: Kintla Lake Campground is open from late May to mid-September

Typical Fill Time: Fills early to mid-afternoon

Closest General Store: Polebridge

Photo Credit: NPS Photo

Logging Creek Campground

Logging Creek Campground is a small campground located on the west side of the park. This campground is accessed via a winding dirt road that handles vehicles up to 21 ft. in length. This mostly a tent campground. This campground is a favorite of people looking to be away from the hustle, but sill want to make a day trip on the Going-to-the-Sun Road. The campground is located near Logging Lake. It is a short hike from the campground to the lake.

This is a primitive campground and there is no water. Bring all water with you.

Sites: 7

Cost: $10 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: No, but the bathrooms are accessible.

RVs?: Sort of, vehicles are limited to 21 ft in length

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: picnic tables, fire pits, pit toilets

Season: Logging Campground is open from July to mid-September

Typical Fill Time: Rarely fills

Closest General Store: Apgar Village

Photo Credit: NPS Photo

Many Glacier Campground

Many Glacier Campground is one of the most popular campgrounds in Glacier National Park. This large campground is located on the east side of the park near Many Glacier Hotel and has easy access to a range of services including a camp store and restaurant. The campground sits in a mature Douglas fir, lodgepole pine, and quaking aspen forest and most sites have some shade. Showers are available at the Swiftcurrent Motor Inn.

Sites: 109

Cost: $23

Reservations Accepted?: Reservations are accepted for 1/2 the sites

ADA specific sites: No, but the bathrooms are accessible

RVs?: Yes, 13 sites can accommodate RV’s up to 35 ft.

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: dump station, flush toilets, fire pits, shower, water

Season: Many Glacier Campground is open from late May to late September

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid-morning

Closest General Store: Many Glacier

Quartz Creek Campground

Quartz Creek Campground is the most peaceful camping in Glacier. This campground hosts 7 sites and is the smallest campground in Glacier. Quartz Creek is accessed via a winding dirt road that handles vehicles up to 21 ft. in length. This mostly a tent campground. The campground is located within a stand of trees but a 12.4-mile roundtrip hike will take campers to the Lower Quartz Lake.

This is a primitive campground and there is no water. Bring all water with you.

Sites: 7

Cost: $10 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: No, but the bathrooms are accessible.

RVs?: No RV’s or trailers

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: pit toilets, fire pits, picnic tables

Season: Quartz Creek Campground is open from July to mid-September

Typical Fill Time: Rarely fills

Closest General Store: Apgar Village

Photo Credit: NPS / James Greig

Rising Sun Campground

Rising Sun Campground has one of the best locations. It is said that Rising Sun is where “the mountains meet the prairies.” It is located right of the Going-to-the-Sun Road and is a great location to start from if trying to beat the crowds to Logan’s Pass. It makes a great base for exploring the rest of Glacier National Park. The campground is located on St. Mary Lake and campers love watching the sunrise over Red Eagle Mountain. There is a campsite and casual restaurant near the campground and showers are available.

Sites: 84

Cost: $20 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: Yes, the designated campsite is #7.

RVs?: Yes, 10 sites can accommodate RV’s up to 25 ft.

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, fire pits, flush toilets, dump station, showers

Season: RisingSun Campground is open from mid-June to mid-September

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid-morning

Closest General Store: Rising Sun

Photo Credit: NPS Photo

Sprague Creek Campground

Sprague Creek Campground is a small campground on the west side of Glacier. The campground is located along the Going-to-the-Sun Road and the shores of Lake McDonald. A select number of sites have unobstructed lake views. A camp store, restaurant, and gift shop can be found 1 mile away at the Lake McDonald Lodge. Boat tours and horse rides are also available at the Lake McDonald Lodge. There is a shuttle stop at the campground.

Sites: 25

Cost: $20 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: Yes, the designated campsite is #1.

RVs?: No RV’s or trailiers

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Picnic tables, fire pits, flush toilets, water

Season: Sprague Creek Campground is open from mid-May to mid-September

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid-morning

Closest General Store: Lake McDonald

Photo: NPS/Gabriel Morrow

St. Mary Campground

St. Mary Campground is one of the most popular in the park. This large east side campground is near the pack boundary. The campground is located along the Going-to-the-Sun Road and is typically open year-round. This campground is a short drive from the town of St. Mary and the St. Mary Visitor Center. This campground doesn’t have a lot of shade but there are some nice aspens around. The campground has several loops including a generator free loop. This campground takes reservations during the summer season.

Sites: 148

Cost: $23 per night

Reservations Accepted?: Reservations accepted up to six months in advance for the summer months.

ADA specific sites: Yes, the designated campsites are C146 and C148.

RVs?: Yes, 3 sites can accommodate RV’s up to 40 ft and 22 sites can accommodate RV’s up to 35 ft.

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, fire pits, flush toilets, showers

Season: St. Mary Campground is open year-round

Typical Fill Time: Reservation during summer, rarely fills the rest of the year.

Closest General Store: St. Mary

Photo Credit: NPS / Jacob W. Frank

Two Medicine Campground

Two Medicine Campground is an area of majestic beauty. This area is often overlooked for the Going-to-the-Sun Road or Many Glacier but it is an area not to be missed. This area sees smaller crowds than other parts of the east side of the park. The Two Medicine Campground is located in the trees and the sites are generally shaded. The campground is close to Two Medicine Lake and has a camp store and gift shop located in Two Medicine Chalet.

Sites: 100

Cost: $20 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: Yes, the designated campsite is #20.

RVs?: Yes, 10 sites can accommodate RV’s up to 35 ft.

Pets: Yes, but please review the Glacier National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, fire pits, pit toilets

Season: Two Medicine Campground is open from June to September

Typical Fill Time: Fills early to late afternoon

Closest General Store: Two Medicine

Photo Credit: NPS / Jacob W. Frank
Get help planning your trip to Glacier National Park

Pin to Save for Later: The Ultimate Guide to Camping in Glacier National Park

Are you considering camping in Glacier National Park? Click here for the ultimate guide Glacier Campgrounds and get ready for a Glacier camping trip. 

Glacier  National Park Camping / Camping at Glacier National Park / National Park Camping / Many Glacier Camping / St. Mary Campground / Montana Camping / Winter Camping
Jennifer is a long time national park blogger and the founder of National Park Obsessed. She is a dedicated National Park lover who is working on visiting all 62 US National Parks. She has currently been to 53 of the National Parks. She is dedicated to sharing her knowledge of the Parks with others and helping them learn to love the parks as much as she does.

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