Death Valley National Park is the land of extremes. From blazing hot temperatures to snow-capped mountain peaks to massive floods, Death Valley doesn’t do anything half-way. Between the extremes and its size, Death Valley can be an overwhelming place. From late fall to early spring, Dean Valley is a popular camping destination. Here is our guide to camping in Death Valley National Park.

Camping in Death Valley provides a great way to stay in the park and be close to the major park attractions. This complete guide covers everything you need to know to plan a Death Valley camping trip including information on the Death Valley campgrounds, location, how to secure a campsite and so much more.

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Death Valley National Park Camping / Camping at Death Valley National Park / National Park Camping / Furnace Creek Camping / Furnace Creek Campground / California Camping / Winter Camping

Getting to Death Valley National Park

There are two airports located in Death Valley National Park. Neither one offers regular commercial flights. The closest commercial airport to Death Valley is the Las Vegas McCarren International Airport (LAS) and is 2.5 hours away from the park. The other option is the Los Angeles area airports.

Estimated Drive Time to Death Valley National Park

  • Las Vegas, Nevada – 2.5 hours
  • Los Angeles, California – 4.5 hours
  • San Diego, California – 4.75 hours
  • Reno, Nevada – 5.25 hours
  • Phoenix, Arizona – 6.5 hours
  • San Francisco, California – 7.5 hours
  • Salt Lake City, Utah – 7.5 hours

There is no official public transportation in or around the park.  However, a bus company called Bundu Bus Company appears to be able to drop you off in the park on their shuttle runs from Las Vegas to Yosemite.  But their website is a little confusing and I get some 400 errors when I tried to scout out the time table.

Please note, if you get dropped off by the Bundu Bus, I would recommend getting a jeep from Farabee’s Rental Jeeps in Furnace Creek so you have transportation around the park.  Check out our review of Farabee’s Jeep Rentals.

Estimated Drive time to Death Valley National Park from nearby National Parks

  • Yosemite National Park – 3 hours
  • Joshua Tree National Park – 4 hours
  • Channel Islands National Park – 4.5 hours
  • Zion National Park – 4.5 hours
  • Sequoia National Park – 5 hours
  • Kings Canyon National Park – 5.5 hours
  • Bryce Canyon National Park – 5.75 hours
  • Grand Canyon National Park – 6 hours
  • Pinnacles National Park – 6.25 hours
  • Capitol Reef National Park – 7 hours
  • Petrified Forest National Park – 7.25 hours
  • Lassen Volcanic National Park – 7.75 hours

Things to Know about Death Valley Camping

  • Death Valley National Parks had 9 public campgrounds and 3 private campgrounds spread out across the park.
  • Four Campgrounds are open year-round. The other 5 campgrounds close for the summer. Check the NPS website for alerts before heading into the park. Conditions in Death Valley can change suddenly and flash floods are not uncommon and can result in sudden campground closures.
  • Reservations are available for 4 Death Valley campgrounds – Furnace Creek (Seasonally), Fiddlers’, Stovepipe Wells RV Park, and Panamint Springs.
  • Furnace Creek Campground Reservations can be made up to six months in advance. The private campgrounds of Fiddlers’, Stovepipe Wells RV Park, and Panamint Springs have a longer booking window.
  • Three Campgrounds have ADA specific sites. Reservable ADA sites are available at Furnace Creek. First-come, first-serve accessible sites can be found at Sunset and Texas Springs. The private campgrounds have a range of paved and non-paved sites. All other campgrounds excluding Wildrose have ADA accessible toilets.
  • Generator use allowed from 7 am to 7 pm in public campgrounds. Generator use is prohibited in Texas Spring in the upper loop during fall, winter, and spring.
  • The larger the RV the less campsites are available.
    • Mahogany Flats Campground, Thorndike Campground, and Wildrose Campground have a length restriction of 25 feet in total length.
    • Texas Springs Campground, Mesquite Springs Campground, and Furnace Creek Campground can be difficult to maneuver into with longer RVs.
    • Sunset Campground and Stovepipe Wells Campground do not have limitations that would restrict RV length.
  • Hookups are only available at Furnace Creek, Stovepipe Wells RV Park, and Panamint Springs. Dump stations are available at all campgrounds except Emigrant, Wildrose, Thorndike and Mahogany Flat.
  • A couple of the campgrounds are reached via unpaved roads that sometimes require 4-wheel drive. Please note that if you are driving a rental vehicle, it is a violation of the rental agreement to drive the vehicle on unpaved roads. Learn more about Death Valley 4-wheel drive rentals.
  • Standard campsites can have up to 8 people.  You are allowed a maximum of two vehicles and two tents. Large groups should reserve a group site in Furnace Creek Campground
  • All wood and charcoal fires are allowed during spring, winter, and fall unless fire danger prompts special restrictions. All fires must be contained in park-provided fire pits. Please do not transport firewood. Burn it where you buy it. Firewood can be purchased at Furnace Creek and Stovepipe Wells general stores. The collection of vegetation for fires is prohibited.
    • All stoves and grills must be gas-burning.
  • Pets must never be left unattended. There is a maximum limit of 4 pets per campsite and pets must be kept on a leash no longer than 6 feet at all times. Pet owners are responsible for cleanup and cleanup supplies.
  • Store all food items in your car or hard-sided container.  Please do NOT leave any food, utensils out, or any scented items.  This includes toothpaste, toothbrush, chapstick.  Pretty much put everything but what you are going to sleep in your car.  Scavengers such as coyotes and ravens have been seen in campgrounds looking for food scraps. Please help keep the wildlife wild by not feeding them.

What to pack for camping in Death Valley National Park?

  1. Printed Campsite Reservation: Just in case anyone asks for it.
  1. America the Beautiful National Parks Pass: Death Valley National Park costs $30 for a 7-day pass.  If you intend to visit more than 3 National Park Services sites in a year, the America the Beautiful Pass will more than pay for itself.
  1. National Park Passport: The National Park Passport Book is the cheapest and best souvenir of your national park adventures. This book makes it easy to collect the National Park Cancellation Stamps. The cancellation stamps have the date of your visit and make it easy to track when you visited each national park service unit.
  1. Tent: This is one of the heaviest and most important pieces of camping gear. It is your shelter from the elements at night.
  1. Sleeping Pad: A sleeping pad is a small, packable inflatable mattress. Here is my favorite closed cell sleeping pad.
  1. Sleeping Bag: Your sleeping bag is important for a good night’s sleep and preventing you from getting to cold.
  1. Pillow: An inflatable pillow is a lightweight comfort item that can make getting a good night’s sleep much easier.
  1. Camp Stove: This portable mini backpacking stove makes car camping cooking much easier. I’d rather cook on this over a campfire any day.
  1. Fuel for the camp stove: I generally by my camping fuel at Walmart or REI on my way to the park. You can’t fly with it so it’s just easier to get on site.
  1. Cooler: One great thing about car camping is that you can keep a cooler in your car and it can keep fresh meat cold and provide cold drinks.
  1. Kitchen Set: It doesn’t take much to make an impressive camp meal but having the right tools can make you seem like a gourmet chef.
  1. Cooking Pot: Since I use a camping stove, I have this great set of folding pots that I do most of my camp cooking with.
  1. Spork: The Spork is the essential eating utensil of the campsite.
  1. Food: If I bring a cooler, I love planning easy to cook camp meals with fresh ingredients otherwise, I use a mix of dry backpacking foods.
  1. Snacks – There are limited services in the park.  So pick up all your snacks before you go.  Pack a couple of different options so you are prepared for any craving.
    • Fruit:  Pick hard fruits such as apples or pears.  These hold-up in the heat and in packs without getting squished to mush. Another option is freeze-dried fruit. Freeze-dried strawberries are the BOMB.  They are crunchy, sweet and the best part is they are lightweight and yummy.  These are my new favorite trail snack.
    • Vegetables: Cucumbers and carrots hold up well during hiking and in a hot car.
    • Granola Bars:  Take your favorite non-coated in chocolate granola bars.  Anything coated in chocolate will melt and be a sticky mess.  My favorite is a selection of Cliff Bars. They are great even when squished.
  1. Refillable Water Bottles – Do your part to reduce litter in our parks by bringing a refillable water bottle with you. A reusable and refillable water bottle can save you a lot of money and really help the environment. Here are my favorite water bottles
  1. Hydration Bladder – If you are hiking longer distances, a hydration bladder is the best way to hike with significant quantities of water. It is a rare hike when I don’t bring a full bladder with me.
  1. Sunscreen – You don’t want to get burned on your visit.
  1. Lip balm – Your lips need just as much sun protection as your skin does.
  1. Sunglasses – Similar to sunscreen, you need a good pair of polarized sunglasses to protect your eyes from the glare of the sun.
  1. Hat – Hats are another sun protection device. A hat can keep the sun off your face and neck and help minimize the need for sunscreen while on the trail.
  1. First aid kit – As with any outdoor adventure, accidents happen. It is better to be prepared and have a compact first-aid kit ready to help with any accidents.
  1. Headlamp – Always keep a headlamp handy. You never know when you might want it. It can be used for midnight bathroom runs to sunrise/sunset hikes. A good headlamp makes it easy to operate in the dark.
  1. Shoes – Shoes are probably the most important piece of gear to any hiker. Hiking shoes should be seen as an investment. On the trail, your feet are your transportation and a solid pair of hiking shoes help support your feet and can prevent injury.
  1. Hiking Day Pack – A good day pack is the best way to transport all your gear when hiking. I highly recommend getting a backpack that is designed for outdoor use. These packs come with handy pockets and straps. My 40 L day pack has a pocket for my water bladder and a clip to hold the water line in place.
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Where to camp in Death Valley National Park?

Death Valley Campground Map

Campgrounds in Death Valley National Park

  • Emigrant Campground
  • Furnace Creek Campground
  • Mahogany Flat Campground
  • Mesquite Spring Campground
  • Stovepipe Wells Campground
  • Sunset Campground
  • Texas Springs Campground
  • Thorndike Campground
  • Wildrose Campground

Private Campgrounds in Death Valley National Park

  • Fiddlers Campground
  • Panamint Springs Resort
  • Stovepipe Wells RV Park

Campgrounds near Death Valley National Park

  • Death Valley RV Park

Getting a Death Valley Campsite

Death Valley Camping Reservations

Furnace Creek Campground is the only public campground in the park that takes reservations. Reservations are available fro stays between October 15 and April 15. Outside of this, the campground is first-come, first-serve. Reservations can be made at Recreation.gov or by calling 877-444-6777. Reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance and must be made 4 days prior to your arrival.

Death Valley First-come, first-serve Campsites

There are 631 first-come, first-serve sites in Death Valley National Park. These are Emigrant, Mahogany Flat, Mesquite Spring, Stovepipe Wells, Sunset, Texas Springs, Thorndike, and Wildrose.

Just show up, find an open site, then head over to the self-serve kiosk and select that site and pay. It is very rare that all of Death Valley campgrounds fill. It only really happens during holiday weekends such as Memorial Day, July 4th and Labor Day and the campgrounds fill in part due to the crowds and partally due to several campground closures.

Your best be for securing a first-come, first-serve campsite is to be at the campground by 8:00 am. If arriving later in the day, your best bet is to see if there is space in Sunset or Stovepipe Wells. With 270 campsites, Sunset almost never fills.

Death Valley Dispersed Roadside Camping

Death Valley is unique among the lower 48 National Parks. It allows a type of camping known as dispersed camping. Dispersed camping is where drive along a road and find a nice pull-off area and you are allowed to set-up camp pretty much anywhere within some guidelines. This type of camping is usually only seen in National Forests or BLM land.

In Death Valley, the rules are simple. You must be 1 mile from a paved road or “day use only” dirt road or historic mining areas or standing mining structures and a least 100 yards from a water source. Off-road driving is prohibited in Death Valley. When roadside camping pull off the road and park adjacent to the roadway.

RV Camping in Death Valley National Park

There are a limited number of RV hook-ups in the campgrounds of Death Valley. These hook-ups are available at Furnace Creek, Panamint Springs and Stovepipe Wells RV. All three take reservations and reservations are highly recommended.

Otherwise, there are no RV hook-ups in the other Death Valley campgrounds

Here are the Death Valley campgrounds that can accommodate RVs or truck/trailer combinations:

  • Fiddlers Campground – No Length Restrictions, all sites are back-in
  • Furnace Creek Campground – No Length Restrictions but longer RV’s may have issues maneuvering
  • Mahogany Flat Campground – Less than 25 ft in total length; high clearance and 4-wheel drive may be necessary
  • Mesquite Spring Campground – No Length Restrictions but longer RV’s may have issues maneuvering
  • Panamint Springs Resort – No Length Restrictions
  • Stovepipe Wells Campground – No Length Restrictions
  • Stovepipe Wells RV Park- No Length Restrictions
  • Sunset Campground – No Length Restrictions
  • Texas Springs Campground – No Length Restrictions but longer RV’s may have issues maneuvering
  • Thorndike Campground – Less than 25 ft in total length; high clearance and 4-wheel drive may be necessary
  • Wildrose Campground – Less than 25 ft in total length

Sunset and Stovepipe Wells are the best RV campgrounds for those not looking for hook-up and would like to be sort of central in Death Valley.

Death Valley National Park Campgrounds

Death Valley Campgrounds at a Glance

CampgroundRegionReservationsSeason Sites Fees ADA SitesAmenities
EmigrantEastNoyear-round10FreeNoF,W
Furnace CreekFurnace CreekSeasonallyyear-round136$16 – $36YesD, F, FP, G, H, W
FiddlersFurnace CreekYesLate Fall – Spring35$24YesD, G, L, S, W
Mahogany FlatEastNoLate Fall – Spring10FreeNoF, FP, G, PA
Mesquite SpringNorthNoyear-round30$14NoD, F, FP, G, W
Panamint SpringsEastYesLate Fall – Spring54$10 – $40YesD, F, G, H, S, W
Stovepipe WellsStovepipe WellsNoLate Fall – Spring190$14NoD, FP, G, W
Stovepipe Wells RVStovepipe WellsYesyear-round14$40YesD, F, H, G, W
SunsetFurnace CreekNoLate Fall – Spring270$14YesD, F, G, W
Texas SpringsFurnace CreekNoLate Fall – Spring92$15YesD, F. FP, W
ThorndikeEastNoLate Fall – Spring6FreeNoFP, G, PA
WildroseEastNoLate Fall – Spring23FreeNoFP, G, P, W

Amenities Key

  • D – Dump Station
  • F – Flush Toilets
  • FP – Fire Pit
  • G – Generator
  • H – Full Hookups
  • P – Pit Toliet
  • PA – Accessible Pit Toliet
  • L – Laundry
  • S – Shower
  • W – Water

Emigrant Campground

Emigrant Campground is a tent-only campground located a short 8-mile drive from Stovepipe Wells. This small campground provides desert mountain views. This campground is away from the hustle and bustle of the larger Death Valley campgrounds. This is a favorite campground for those tent camping in Death Valley. Emigrant Campground has water and flush toilets.

Sites: 10

Cost: Free

Reservations Accepted?: No, this campground is first-come, first-served.

ADA specific sites: No, but the campground is flat and gravel. The flush toilets are accessible.

RVs?: No, Emigrant is a tents-only campground.

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, flush toilets

Season: Emigrant Campground is open year-round.

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid-morning from October-April and on Holiday Weekends

Closest General Store: Stovepipe Wells

Photo Credit: C N, CC BY-SA 2.0

Furnace Creek Campground

Furnace Creek Campground is located in the heart of Death Valley. This popular campground is located in the Furnace Creek area and is conveniently located near much of Death Valley’s amenities and there is limited cell service at this campground. Some of these campsites are tucked up into the trees and will have shade at times during the day. This is a real treat when camping in Death Valley. Furnace Creek Campground has water and flush toilets.

Sites: 136; 18 have hook-ups; 5 group sites

Cost: $22 per night for standard sites from October 15 to April 15; $16 the rest of the year. Hook-up sites are $36.00. Group Sites are $35-$60.

Reservations Accepted?: Reservations are accepted from October 15 to April 15. Furnace Creek is first-come, first-served the rest of the year. Make your reservation at Recreation.gov.

ADA specific sites: Yes and they are reservable.

RVs?: Yes, No Length Restrictions but longer RV’s may have issues maneuvering

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, flush toilets, dump station

Season: Furnace Creek Campground is open year-round.

Typical Fill Time: Reservations from October-April. Fills on Holiday Weekends the rest of the year

Closest General Store: Furnace Creek

Fiddlers’ Campground

Fiddlers’ Campground is a private campground in Furnace Creek. This small campground is part of The Ranch at Death Valley Resort. This campground comes with access to the Ranch’s natural spring-fed swimming pool, shower facility, coin-operated laundry, and sports courts including a Tennis Court, Shuffleboard, Volleyball, Bocce Ball, and Basketball Court. This campground doesn’t offer hook-ups but it popular with families. Fiddler’s Campground has water and flush toilets.

Sites: 35

Cost: $24 per night

Reservations Accepted?: Reservations are accepted year-round. Make your reservation here.

ADA specific sites: No, but much of the area is paved.

RVs?: No Length Restrictions, all sites are back-in

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, community fire pits, picnic area, shower, swimming pool, sports courts

Season: Fiddler’s Campground is open year-round.

Typical Fill Time: Reservations are highly recommend.

Closest General Store: Furnace Creek

Photo Credit: Airwolfhound, CC BY-SA 2.0

Mahogany Flat Campground

Mahogany Flat Campground is the highest campground in the park. It is located at 8,200 feet above sea level. This remote campground is reached by a winding unpaved roads that on occasion requires 4-wheel drive to reach. Mahogany Flat is located near the trailheads for Telescope Peak and Wildrose peak. Mahogany Flat Campground does not have portable water and has pit toilets.

Sites: 10

Cost: Free

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: No, but the toilets are accessible.

RVs?: Yes, Less than 25 ft in total length; high clearance and 4-wheel drive may be necessary

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Picnic tables, fire pits, pit toilets

Season: Late spring through fall

Typical Fill Time: Mid to late mornings

Closest General Store: Panamint Springs

Photo Credit: The Greater Southwestern Exploration Company, CC BY 2.0

Mesquite Spring Campground

Mesquite Springs Campground is located in the northern region of Death Valley. This campground provides easy access to Ubehebe Crater, Scotty’s Castle, and the access road to the Racetrack Playa. This small campground is located at 1,800 feet in elevation and is often cooler than the Furnace Creek or Stovepipe Wells campsite. Mesquite Spring Campground has water and flush toilets.

Sites: 30

Cost: $14 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: Yes and they are reservable.

RVs?: Yes, no length restrictions but longer RV’s may have issues maneuvering

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, fire pits, flush toilets, dump station

Season: Mesquite Springs Campground is open year-round.

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid-morning from October-April. Fills on Holiday Weekends the rest of the year

Closest General Store: Furnace Creek / Stovepipe Wells

Photo Credit: Lars Dugaiczyk, CC BY-ND 2.0

Panamint Springs Resort

Panamint Springs Resort is one of the private campgrounds in the park and is located in the western region of the park. This campground is located along Route 190 near Jedi/Rainbow Canyon. This campground offers tent and RV sites as well as canvas tents.

Sites: 54 sites: 22 tent, 26 dry, 6 full hook-up

Cost: $10 for tent sites, $20 for dry sites, $40 for full hook-up

Reservations Accepted?: .302They can be made by calling +1.775.482.7680 or by email reservations@panamintsprings.com

ADA specific sites: Not specifically, but man of the sites are paved or packed earth.

RVs?: Yes, no length restrictions

Pets: Yes, $5 per pert

Facilities: Water, fire pits, showers, some sites have picnic tables

Season: Panamint Springs Resort is open year-round.

Typical Fill Time: Reservations are recommended. There are walk-in sites available but usually fill early morning from Fall to Spring.

Closest General Store: Panamint Springs Resort

Photo Credit: David Brossard, CC BY-SA 2.0

Stovepipe Wells Campground

Stovepipe Wells Campground is one of the largest campgrounds in the park. This large campground is located next to Stovepipe Wells Village and has a general store, restaurant and gas station. This campground is less expensive than Furnace Creek but doesn’t accept reservations. Even without reservations, there is usually campsites available. Stovepipe Wells offers flush toilets and portable water.

Sites: 190

Cost: $14 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: Not specifically, but many of the sites are paved or packed earth.

RVs?: Yes, no length restrictions

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables (at some sites), fire pits (at some sites), flush toilets, dump station

Season: Stovepipe Wells Campground is open from late spring to early fall

Typical Fill Time: Doesn’t usually fill unless it’s a holiday weekend

Closest General Store: Stovepipe Wells

Photo Credit: runarut, CC BY 2.0

Stovepipe Wells RV Park

Stovepipe Wells RV Park is a small campground run by Stovepipe Wells hotel. This small campground RV focused campground. These are full hookup RV sites which include access to the hotel’s swimming pool and wifi.

Sites: 14

Cost: $40

Reservations Accepted?: Reservations are accepted.

ADA specific sites: Not specifically, but many of the sites are paved or packed earth.

RVs?: Yes, no length restrictions

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, flush toilet, WiFi and swimming pool

Season: Stovepipe Wells RV Campground is open year-round.

Typical Fill Time: Typically filled via reservation.

Closest General Store: Stovepipe Wells

Photo Credit: runarut, CC BY 2.0

Sunset Campground

Sunset Campground is located in Furnace Creek and is a first-come, first-serve campground. This is the largest campground in the park with 270 sites. This campground is basically a gravel parking lot with white chalk campsites. It is primarily an RV and travel trailer campground. Sunset Campground has water and flush toilets. This campground is your best bet on busy holiday weekends.

Sites: 270

Cost: $14 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: Yes, they are first-come, first-serve.

RVs?: Yes, no length restrictions

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, flush toilets, dump station

Season: Sunset Campground is open from late Fall through Spring.

Typical Fill Time: Rarely fills

Closest General Store: Furnace Creek

Photo Credit: Vivian Chen [陳培雯], CC BY-ND 2.0

Texas Springs Campground

Texas Springs Campground is the last and smallest of the Furnace Creek campgrounds. It is one mile away from the visitor center and is a little quieter than the other campgrounds. Texas Springs Campground has water and flush toilets.

Sites: 92

Cost: $16 per night

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: Yes, they are first-come, first-serve.

RVs?: Yes, no length restrictions but longer RV’s may have issues maneuvering

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, fire pits, flush toilets, dump station

Season: Texas Spring Campground is open from late Fall through Spring.

Typical Fill Time: Fills mid-morning

Closest General Store: Furnace Creek

Photo Credit: Bill Ward, CC BY 2.0

Thorndike Campground

Thorndike Campground is the smallest campground in Death Valley. It is located near Mahogany Flats Campground and is a great base for summiting Telescope or Wildrose peaks. This campground is located at 7,400 ft of elevation.

There is no water at this campground.

Sites: 6

Cost: Free

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: No, but the toilets are accessible.

RVs?: Yes, less than 25 ft in total length; high clearance and 4-wheel drive may be necessary

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Picnic tables, fire pits, pit toilets

Season: Thorndike Campground is open from late spring to through fall.

Typical Fill Time: Mid to late mornings

Closest General Store: Panamint Springs

Wildrose Campground

Wildrose Campground is one of the more remote camping options in Death Valley. This campground is located near the Wildrose Charcoal Kilns.

Furnace Creek Campground has water and flush toilets.

Sites: 23

Cost: Free

Reservations Accepted?: No, first-come, first-served

ADA specific sites: No

RVs?: Yes, less than 25 ft in total length

Pets: Yes, but please review the Death Valley National Park Pet Policy

Facilities: Water, picnic tables, fire pits, pit toilets

Season: Wildrose Campground is open year-round

Typical Fill Time: Mid to late mornings

Closest General Store: Panamint Springs

Photo Credit: daveynin, CC BY 2.0
Get help planning your Death Valley National Park Trip

Pin to Share: The Ultimate Guide to Camping in Death Valley National Park

Are you considering camping in Death Valley National Park? Click here for the ultimate guide Death Valley Campgrounds and get ready for a Death Valley camping trip.

Death Valley National Park Camping / Camping at Death Valley National Park / National Park Camping / Furnace Creek Camping / Furnace Creek Campground / California Camping / Winter Camping
Jennifer is a long time national park blogger and the founder of National Park Obsessed. She is a dedicated National Park lover who is working on visiting all 62 US National Parks. She has currently been to 53 of the National Parks. She is dedicated to sharing her knowledge of the Parks with others and helping them learn to love the parks as much as she does.

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