The Ultimate Guide to Camping in Devils Tower National Monument

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Devils Tower National Monument is a special place.  The tower stands 1,267 feet from the surrounding area.  Devils Tower has been a human gathering place from the start of human occupation of the area.  The Native Americans consider the site sacred.  Their offerings are often seen in the trees around the Monument.  Climbers will test their skill by climbing to the summit of Devils Tower.  Flim enthusiasts come to the site of the alien landing in Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

Devils Tower Camping

Things to Know about Devils Tower

  • Camping is available from May to October.  Opening and Closing Dates can vary from year to year.  These dates are weather dependent. Check the NPS website for the latest on campground opening and closing dates.
    • June is the parks busiest month.  Devils Tower is a sacred site to several Native American tribes and they come to the park to perform religious rituals during this month.
  • There is limited camping. Get the campground as early as possible and have a back plan.
  • Each tent campsite can have up to 8 people.  There is space for two tents and two vehicles at the campsite.  The campsite has a picnic table.  Many of the campsites have a fire pit.  Please double check the fire regulations and ensure your fire is completely out before going to bed.
  • Store all food items in your car.  Please do NOT leave any food, utensils out, or any scented items.  This includes toothpaste, toothbrush, chapstick.  Pretty much put everything but what you are going to sleep in your car.  Devils Tower is in bear country but they are rarely seen in the are.  Even so, properly secure all items so no wildlife can get it.

Getting to Devils Tower National Monument

Devils Tower is a great weekend trip from Denver or a stop on the way road trip to Yellowstone or Glacier National Park.  Devils Tower is also a short drive from the Black Hills of South Dakota.

Looking to make a pitstop and visit Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming? Here is your guide to camping in Devils Tower National Monument.

** All Campground prices are valid as of 29 July 2018.

Devils Tower Campgrounds

Belle Fourche River Campground

Belle Fourche River Campground is the only government campground within a 45-minute drive of Devils Tower National Monument.  Belle Fourche has two loops.  The campground is spread out among the trees but there isn’t really any privacy of the campsites.  The best part of the campground is that you can get a campsite with a view of the Tower.

Season May to October
Number of Sites 46 individual sites & 3 group sites (4 ADA individual sites)
Fee per night $20 per individual site & $60 per group site
Reservations Available First-come First-serve
Max RV Length 35 ft
RV Hook-up No
Restrooms Flush Toilets
Water Cold Running Water
Showers No
Max Length of Stay 14  Days
Wheelchair Accessibility Yes
Wifi on Property No
Laundry Facilities No
Pets Allowed Yes, but please review the Devils Tower Pet Policy
Typical Fill Time Typically fills early afternoon on the weekends and late afternoon on weekdays.  
Closest General Store  Hulett

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Jennifer has been obsessed with national parks as a child.  This Tennessee native spent her childhood exploring the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and traveling with her parents to National Parks and around the Caribbean.  She is always planning her next adventure and is ready to see the world while trying to visit all 59 National Park (*She is ignoring the hunk of concrete that just became a national park).

Jennifer Melroy

Jennifer has been obsessed with national parks as a child.  This Tennessee native spent her childhood exploring the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and traveling with her parents to National Parks and around the Caribbean.  She is always planning her next adventure and is ready to see the world while trying to visit all 59 National Park (*She is ignoring the hunk of concrete that just became a national park).

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